The Motorcycle was Stolen!


“Bloody hell!” Wayan Karma was shocked when he opened the front door.

“What’s going on?” his wife, Nyoman Mariani, running from the kitchen, was apprehensive.

“The motorcycle was stolen!”

“Did you lock it?”

“Do you think I’m stupid? Of course I did lock it!” Wayan was ablaze in fury. His heart was pounding uncontrollably. “Now that you asked me the question, I cannot imagine myself marrying a woman who thinks I’m stupid!”

So the loss of the motorcycle that morning had caused another argument in the house, just like the night before when Mariani wanted extra grocery money, and similar to the previous days when Wayan went home empty handed and started arguing with Mariani. Prolonged bickering and quarrels had synonymously dwelled in the house since the the beginning of their marriage.

Their two teenage children, Putu Gayatri and Kadek Moyo, had been used to growing up with Mariani’s incessant clamour and Wayan’s constant shouts.

And the cause to their quarrels? Money. The family and the other traditional blue-collar Balinese families in their neighborhood were alike: they had not found the antidote to their poverty.

For Wayan the loss of the motorcycle was a tragedy; it meant losing a fortune. Sitting in the veranda, he sobbed in grief, “Oh, now all my hardwork had gone, seven million rupiah had gone. Oh, life!” In despair he tilted his head as if waiting for some miraculous dream to come and show him where the motorcycle was.

“Pak, look what I have found!” Mariani shouted from the dining room. She briskly thrust her hand and handed over a brief letter to her husband.

“Dear Mum and Dad,
You must be upset that the motorcycle has now gone.”

Wayan and Mariani exchanged glances. In a fraction of a second they ran into Kadek Moyo’s room. But the dark-haired narrow eyes Kadek Moyo wasn’t there.

Still holding the letter with his right hand, Wayan gazed at his wife in tremulous fear. Mariani returned the look of her husband in sorrow, with glistening tear dropping from her eyes.

The letter continued,
“But judging from what you have been arguing every day, I am in absolute certainty that you are more worried about losing the motorcycle than losing me.

Your son, 

Kadek Moyo 

77 thoughts on “The Motorcycle was Stolen!

  1. We humans have grown to become materialistic. Attachment is the root cause of sorrow.
    Once we realize that, our problems will be gone and happiness will thrive.

    Thank you for sharing this story for most of us are busy protecting and taking care of our so-called luxuries and don’t realize the value of the bond we have with our loved ones and continue to ignore them.

    -Nid

    • Oh, you read this story?! Thank you! 🙂 I found Facebook link to access the post was not very successful in the past. But now I think it is a good idea to do, especially when someone is commenting on the post after I provide the link on my FB page. Thank you again.

      And yes, you are right. We often “don’t realize the value of the bond we have with our loved ones”. And by the way, “Kadek Moyo” is fictional character for a real person. He’s one of the people commenting in this blog, he’s my dear friend. Can you guess which one? An easy venture, after all. LOL 🙂

      Subhan Zein

  2. what a lovely short story! its a harrowing fact, that people care more about materialistic things than the people around them, their loved ones.

    • You are totally right, Lindy! Thank you for following my blog! 🙂 I hope your visits have been and will always be a joyful ride! 🙂

      Subhan Zein

  3. And, you write soooooo beautifully! Love your ink, mind and fingers that pen away. Keep writing, it is awesome, Subhan. Hugs.

  4. Humans sometimes are selfish and can do things that no one can ever think of. We are always money minded, externally driven. As always you did a good job. Well written! ~Jigme

    • Thank you very much, Jigme. I’m so happy that you loved it. Stay tuned my friend, hope you will love my subsequent posts as much as you loved this. Have a lovely day, my friend! 🙂

      Subhan Zein

  5. God, that really was sad!People around us ARE living in tight situations, and they are not being materialistic.Money DOES matter, if it is unable to give you basics of life.Parents want to make ends meet for kids, else an individual can sleep on streets and live with little.it’s their love for their families which sometime makes them impatient.Their son could have helped them by doing something to relieve their monetary burdens, like giving tutions or working in a fast food chain etc in off hours from studies (if he was!).Life is tough for one and all in one way or the other, if we need to prove our importance, we need to give the aspirations and needs of others importance, esp. if they are family.
    But i well-received the ACTUAL moral of the story, relationships are more important than monetary gains.A thought-provoking, true post Subhan!

    • You are totally right, my lovely sister. Totally. I’m glad that you loved the post, so please do come here often. Your presence is merrily celebrated. 🙂

      Subhan Zein

  6. sometimes ppl r so busy in materialistic things and all useless crap that they tend to forget the valuable ppl and things in their lives..
    this story fantatsically explains that and sometimes its too late to mend things up !!

    Awesome read 🙂

    • Hi Jyoti,

      Thank you very much for your nice comment. I really appreciate it. Please consider sharing it to anyone you think would benefit from it. Thank you and have a lovely day, my friend! 🙂

      Subhan Zein

  7. So true in many households unfortunately…your writing evokes so much emotion, thanks for sharing! …and for reminding us of what’s important…

    • Thank you very much for stopping by and leaving your beautiful footprints here. Please come more often, because your presence is merrily celebrated.. 🙂

      Subhan Zein

    • Hello Nuelene, no they didn’t notice in the first place. They just found it heartbreaking after reading the letter and didn’t find Moyo in his room.

      I’m glad you enjoy it, my lovely friend! 🙂

      Subhan Zein

  8. I want to thank your visits to my blog, I love to see you out there and certainly let me come here because it is always read you learn not only what you write but also …

    a hug

    • Thank you, dear! Yes, it’s a true story. It’s about my friend, Andi, whose childhood name is Moyo. He’s an amazing person! 🙂

      By the way, do you happen to know other people from your country who understand English and maybe interested in reading this kind of story and my soul-uplifting poems? I’d be very grateful if you do and are willing to let them know about me..Please let me know, dear. Thank you very much! 🙂

      Hugs from my heart,

      Subhan Zein

  9. Hi, a friend, Brujilla , recommended this site and I checked out and it´s great.
    This story makes me much to think about. I’ll spend more time around here.
    Excuse me my English, It´s horrible
    By the way, I’m from Spain like Brujilla

    Nice to meet you Subhan Zein

    • Hello,

      Thank you very much for stopping by and for subscribing to my Blog! You are most welcome here, my lovely Spanish friend! 🙂 I am also most thankful to Brujilla.. 🙂

      Don’t worry about your English, I’m even the one who doesn’t speak Spanish. I only know Spanish very little. LOL. 🙂

      Yes, I am very delighted to share my story and soul-uplifting poems to you. I’m writing inspiring stories from around the world, because I would love to share the rich cultures that we currently live in to as many people as possible. If you do happen to know other people from your country who understand English and maybe interested in reading this kind of story and my poems, I’d be very grateful if you are willing to pass my stories on to them..

      That way we could lit the candles and spread the joy. If you’re happy to do this, I’d be very grateful.

      Thank you and have a lovely day, my friend! 🙂

      Hugs from my heart,

      Subhan Zein

  10. Oh, such a good flash fiction…..and loved those last lines written in the letter….

      • and I can totally relate to this story….as with my family, it’s the same….

      • Oh really? The story is a true story, actually, it’s about my friend, Andi. I learn a lot from him :-). And since you can relate to the story, perhaps you’d like to do the same? He stole the motorcycle and it was a good shock therapy for his parents. Ever since then they never fought over money and other trivialities of life.. 🙂

        Subhan Zein

      • Oh, I have my only bike that I love….lol…but I would love to see them happy and not fight on petty issues of materialism….a wake up call is needed to change….:)

  11. ¿I said Monday? I meant Wednesday, sorry, sometimes I don’t remember in what day I’m living 😀

  12. That history remembers me a sentence that asks “If we were made to love people and use things, ¿Why we just use people and love things?”. People worries about things that have no other value except economic value, because they take for granted that people will be always there.

    I found your blog through brujjilla’s blog and I was really pleased and impressed

    Have a nice Monday.

    • Hello,

      Thank you very much for stopping by and for subscribing to my Blog! You are most welcome here, my lovely Spanish friend! 🙂 I am also most thankful to Brujilla.. 🙂

      Don’t worry about the day, that happens to me all the time.. 🙂

      Well of couse, I am very delighted to share my story and soul-uplifting poems to you. I’m writing inspiring stories from around the world, because I would love to share the rich cultures that we currently live in to as many people as possible. If you do happen to know other people from your country who understand English and maybe interested in reading this kind of story and my poems, I’d be very grateful if you are willing to pass my stories on to them..

      That way we could lit the candles and spread the joy. If you’re happy to do this, I’d be very grateful. What do you think?

      Thank you and have a lovely day, my friend! 🙂

      Subhan Zein

  13. Pingback: Subhan Zein « Brujjilla's Blog

  14. That story so full of feelings and teachings, I liked it.
    I think it can help people to remember what values ​​should dominate the people.
    Kisses Subhan

    • Thank you, dear! 🙂 Yes, it’s a true story. It’s about my friend, Andi whose childhood name is Moyo. He’s an amazing person! 🙂

      By the way, do you happen to know other people from your country who understand English and maybe interested in reading this kind of story and my soul-uplifting poems? I’d be very grateful if you do and are willing to let them know about me..Please let me know, dear..

      Hugs from my heart,

      Subhan Zein

  15. Very good story Mas. And thank you for using a Balinese setting for this. It does help to be reflective, always. Wonderfully captured. Keep writing Mas! 🙂
    Hery Santosa

  16. That last sentnce – What a hit!

    Reminds me of a time when a neighbour berated her son for returning home in the wee hours of the morning. Her shouting woke us.

    When she saw me step out, she turned to complain about her son. I simply told her that if my son returned late and like her if I had stayed up all night – I would be happy that he returned safe.

    That shut her up and I went back to my interrupted sleep.

    Sadly, after that morning, that neighbour stopped speaking to me. But her husband, son and I remained fast friends…

    • When I heard the story, I thought how smart Kadek Moyo was, he tried to make a point to his parents. And when the parents realized, he returned with the motorcycle. Never had his parents argued over money and other trivialities of life ever since.

      It’s a real story; “Kadek Moyo” is my friend. I learn a lot from him..:-)

      Subhan Zein

    • Thank you, Ian, you’re right, of coure. 🙂 When I heard the story, I thought how smart Kadek Moyo was, he tried to make a point to his parents. And when he the parents realized, he returned with the motorcycle. Once he did this, never had his parents argued over money and other trivialities of life ever since. 🙂

      It’s a real story; “Kadek Moyo” is my friend. I learn a lot from him..:-)

      Subhan Zein

    • I hope you will be understanding if the limitation of my imagination cannot well-illustrate the reality as you might have expected. I’m still growing, after all.. 🙂

      Subhan Zein

  17. Hmmm…were the first words that came out of my mouth after reading this. Very deep, well done as always. We take so many things for granted and worry about the insignificant because we have them so important, we lose sight of what matters most. Thanks for sharing 🙂

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